The Korubo live in Brazil’s western Amazon Basin and were once referred to by explorers as the “clubbers.” The aggressive tribe’s preferred hunting and battle weapon is the club, often used along with poisoned darts. Since they were first discovered by the government in 1972, 7 census workers have been killed trying to make contact. Peaceful relations were briefly established in 1997, before splinter groups left the main tribe to hide in the jungle. They are one of nearly 70 uncontacted tribes in the Amazon who continue to kill outsiders and attack approaching aircraft. In 2011, Peru’s Ministry of Environment released this video appearing to show uncontacted natives along the Manu River. The video was shot by a tourist who did not realize he had captured the closest images yet of the Mashco-Piro tribe. Subsequent research expeditions ended in failure after one guide was shot through the heart by a poison arrow… …and the government has banned contact, as the tribe has been so isolated that even the common cold could wipe them out. Despite the ban, some Mashco-Piro have begun emerging on their own in search of weapons to defend themselves from hostile outsiders. North Sentinel Island in the Bay of Bengal is home to The Sentinelese, one of the few uncontacted tribes outside of South America. They have made so little advancement that it’s believed they can’t produce fire and subsist on fish and coconuts. Boats have tried to approach the island, but are met with fierce armed resistance on the beach, as seen in this photo from off shore. The small amount of contact with the tribe has resulted in violence and even the death of two fishermen in 2006. A helicopter that came to collect their bodies had to abort landing after encountering a savage bow and arrow attack. The Pintupi are an Aboriginal group who live in a harsh and remote part of the Western Desert of Australia. They remained undisturbed by the modern world until Australia’s Blue Streak nuclear deterrent missile tests in the 1960s… …when a military survey team was surprised to discover that the missiles were impacting an inhabited area. The Pintupi were removed from the test site and, believed to be unfit for modern life, forced into assimilation camps. A nomadic group dubbed the “Pintupi Nine” defied attempts at contact and remained a “lost tribe” in the desert until 1984… During the war in Vietnam, many troops pushed deeper into the jungles in order to hide stashes of weapons and supplies… …and in what is now Phong Nha – Ke Bang national park, soldiers first made sightings of the mysterious Ruc Peoples. These shy forest dwellers were very difficult to see and had an unbelievable agility when moving between the trees. Their culture emphasizes witchcraft, and their spells are said to be able to control the beasts of the jungle. In one case, a researcher reportedly began foaming at the mouth with blood after disobeying and angering a Ruc elder…