Hey guys this is Josh here with Trillium: Wild Edibles. I’m sitting inside of my house and I’m about to process up these Spicebush twigs, that we harvested out a few minutes ago. So whenever you want to go to harvest your Spicebush, some of the things you can use; obviously are the leaves, and the berries. You can also use the young twigs, you can also use the bark. Older twigs such as this one here it’s about pencil sized, around the size of my pinky. Those are too big to use, they’ll still have some flavor but they will be a little more bitter. And you won’t notice that extremely aromatic scent when ever you use these big twigs for your teas. So if you want the most flavor from Spicebush, you’re best using the young twigs, and the leaves. Here on this twig you guys maybe able to see the color change. you see how right above the tip of the scissors the color changes from a darker brown to a gray on the bark of the twig. That’s something else I use as an indicator for which part of the twigs I like to harvest. You want to harvest everything that’s dark brown, or green. You don’t want to harvest the twigs that are gray. The reason for that is like I said before they are a little more bitter, and they don’t have as much flavor to them. Alright so once you’ve got your Spicebush twigs and you’re inside your house. You can do this outside, you can do it at the park where you harvested them, it just depends on who you are and what you feel like doing with them. I really like throwing things I forage, that I’m not going to be using, I to my compost pile. You may be different. However the first thing we’re going to do is we’re just going to shuck all these leaves off. And you can pluck them off one by one. Or you can grab the twig and you can shuck them all off like that. And if you want you can use these leaves for your tea as well. Like I said out in the field I generally don’t use the leaves. Especially this time of year, in the early Spring the leaves are actually really good for tea. But this time of the year I find they’re just a little too bitter, for my personal liking. However you may be different you may like the bitterness of them some people do. And you may see these little green buds on here, I know my camera isn’t really focusing right now; Howver you can leave these little green buds on they are not going to hurt anything. Okay so now that we’ve got our leaves off of our Spicebush twigs and our house reeks of Spicebush. The next thing we want to do, is you want to rinse off your Spicebush twigs in the sink. And after you’ve rinsed them off go ahead and take your scissors, and just cut them up into pieces that are about two to three inches in length. Then gather all of those up, and then you can make your tea. However you can see some of the twigs that I’ve cut there, you can see thse little green specks from those little buds. Like I said those are totally okay to use, they’re not going to hurt you at all. The good thing about Spicebush is that none of the plant to my knowledge is toxic. However some of it like the berries may not be palatable right off the plant. And chewing twigs isn’t really necessary but these would make a good toothbrush if you had nothing else, or a chew stick if you will, and they also taste good. So we’re just going to take those and we’re going to cut the rest of those up to that size over there; about two to three inches. Then we’re going to steep them into some tea. Our water’s almost ready here, what I like to do to make my teas, because if you use boiling water you’re going to actually extract more flavors and medicinals out of the herbs than you will if you just steep them. And that can be a good thing, but that can also be a really bad thing. Some plants whenever you boil them their flavors become too strong, sometimes the bitter overtones will come out, sometimes sour overtones will come out, it just really depends on which plant you’re working with. And with Spicebush something I’ve noticed is if I boil it I actually get a lot more of those bitter flavors. Okay you can see our water is ready and it’s almost getting ready to boil. At this point we’re just going to turn off the burner and dump our twigs right in there. Once you get your twigs in what I like to do is just kind of shake it up a little bit. Just like your making any other tea like you would dunk a teabag, it helps to release a lot of the flavors, minerals, and antioxidants from the plant, or the bark, or twigs in this case for example. Okay so we’ve got our Spicebush twigs in our hot water, we’re just going to let it steep for ten to fifteen minutes, and then I’ll get back to you. Okay at this point it’s been ten to fifteen minutes and our Spicebush is done. We just want to take a fork and pick out these sticks. Okay and as you can see our Spicebush is all taken out. And you may notice that this waters actually clear. Spicebush doesn’t really produce a lot of color it just produces a lot of flavor. And at this point you could just pour some of this out into a cup and sweeten it up with sugar, or honey. Agave nectar or whatever it is that you prefer to sweeten it with. Even maple syrup or molasses. However you could also put some sugar in here; you know there’s about a cup and a half of water so you would probably want to put anywhere from a cup toa cup and a quarter of sugar, and you could boil this down and reduce it and turn it into a syrup. What I’m going to do however is I’m just going to take a little bit of raw honey. Then I’ll put myself a little bit of raw honey in this cup And I’m going to make myself a little bit of Spicebush tea. Then I’m going to take the rest of this and I’m going to boil it into some syrup. Alright, now our tea is done, our honey is melted it’s ready to drink. (takes drink)…. Ahhh. Mmm that’s good. ( Continues drinking). ..Mmm..Ahhhh…